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Hawaiian Poke (Ready in Only 10 Minutes!)

Hawaiian Poke (Ready in Only 10 Minutes!)

Quick and easy Hawaiian Poke loaded with all the island flavors you love – sashimi grade ahi tuna, sweet onions, soy sauce, sesame oil, and green onions. Optional flavors, to amp up the Hawaiian Poke Bowl: ginger, Sriracha and sesame seeds.

This Hawaiian Poke recipe is similar to our beloved Ahi Tuna PokeTuna CrudoSalmon CrudoTemaki Sushi, Kani Salad and Crunchy Spicy Tuna Roll!

Hawaiian Poke Recipe Ingredients

Here are the ingredients needed to make this recipe for Hawaiian poke (pronounced po-kay). This homemade version rivals the best poke on Maui and the best poke on Kauai.

Fresh fish with small bowls of ingredients

Required Ingredients

  • Ahi Tuna – Buy tuna labeled “sushi or sashimi grade” for the best quality.
  • Sweet Onions – Maui onions are traditionally used, but they’re hard to find on the mainland.
  • Soy Sauce – If you add Hawaiian salt to the mix, use low sodium soy sauce. If you opt to exclude the Hawaiian Salt, you can use regular soy sauce. If you use regular soy sauce and the Hawaiian Salt, it will be a salt bomb in your mouth. 
  • Sesame Oil – Sesame oil becomes rancid with time, so check to see if your bottle is still fresh.
  • Green Onions – You can replace with scallions.

Optional Ingredients

  • Hawaiian Salt (‘alaea) – Substitute with pink Himalayan Salt if you don’t want to shell out a few extra bucks for Hawaiian salt.
  • Grated Ginger
  • Sesame Seeds (Garnish)

Diced fish on a cutting board with small bowls of other food.

How To Make Poke

This Hawaiian poke recipe will be ready to grub down on in just 10 minutes as there are just 3 short steps.

Mix the Marinade

Whisk together the marinade ingredients, taste and adjust to your individual taste. 

Dice the Fish

Pat the tuna dry with a paper towel and dice into 1/2″ cubes to really let the marinade shine in each bite.

Marinate the Tuna

Pour the marinade over the diced tuna and gently fold until each piece is well coated. Top with sesame seeds and enjoy immediately!

Bowl of raw fish and onions.

Hawaiian Poke Bowl

To make this a Hawaiian Poke Bowl, just whip up a batch of Sushi Rice Instant Pot and get to topping! Here are some ideas:

  • Microgreens
  • Macadamia Nuts
  • Inamona
  • Tobiko or Masago
  • Sliced Avocado
  • Cucumbers
  • Edamame
  • Pickled Ginger
  • Mango
  • Wonton Strips
  • Seaweed Salad
  • Shichimi Togarashi

What Is Poke

Poke is a Hawaiian recipe made with raw fish. Poke means “section” or “to slice or cut”. It’s traditionally served as either an appetizer or main dish.

Traditional Hawaiian-style poke is made with cubed ahi or yellowfish tuna and tossed with shoyu (soy sauce), sesame oil, maui onions, and green onions. We added a few extra ingredients to maximize the flavor, while keeping true to the spirit of Aloha. 

Overview shot of Hawaiian Poke in a white bowl.

Variations

Looking to mix things up? We gotcha covered! Here are some popular variations:

Spicy Hawaiian Poke

Include the Sriracha or Garlic Chili Sauce as called out in the recipe card to make this a spicy poke.

Vegan Poke

Replace the ahi tuna with firm tofu to make tofu poke. Marinate the tofu for 30 minutes before serving.

Salmon Poke

Replace the tuna with cubed sashimi grade salmon for a shoyu salmon version.

Shrimp Poke

Replace the tuna with cooked shrimp to make shrimp poke – a fully cooked version of poke.

Tako Poke

Replace the tuna with baby octopus.

Poke Calories

We can easily grub down on a huge bowl of Hawaiian poke, but ain’t no shame in our grub game. Why? Each 4 ounce serving has only 181 calories. Plus it’s loaded with Omega-3 fatty acids. 

Raw Fish

Number one rule when buying fresh fish: Buy from a reputable source! No exceptions.

You’re looking for sushi grade tuna with a bright pink or reddish color. Do not buy albacore, as this is the tuna used in canned tuna.

Sushi grade raw tuna is considered safe to consume if down within two days. Raw fish isn’t recommended for pregnant women, the elderly or immunocompromised individuals. To add – we aren’t food safety experts so consult your doctor or own food safety expert if unsure.

Bowl of Hawaiian Poke

Recipe Tips

Check out your local Asian market as they tend to have sushi grade ahi tuna. Frozen sushi grade tuna would also work if you can’t find fresh.

Prepare and serve Hawaiian poke as close to serving as possible for the best texture and flavor. If serving for a party, prep the fish in one bowl and the marinade in another. Toss right before serving.

Raw fish recipes are best consumed the same day as purchased, however, it will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 days. The flavor will become more “fishy” with time.

More Seafood Recipes:

Baked Lobster Tail
Clam Chowder
Steamer Clams with Garlic Butter
Instant Pot Salmon
Lemon Garlic Shrimp
Shrimp Cocktail
Coconut Shrimp

Hawaiian Poke Recipe
Print Recipe
5 from 3 votes

Hawaiian Poke Bowl

Quick and easy Hawaiian Poke loaded with all the island flavors you love - sashimi grade ahi tuna, sweet onions, soy sauce, sesame oil, and green onions. 
Prep Time10 mins
Total Time10 mins
Course: Appetizer, Dinner, Lunch
Cuisine: Hawaiian
Keyword: Ahi Tuna
Servings: 6 Servings
Calories: 181kcal
Author: Darcey Olson
Cost: $25

Ingredients

  • lbs Sashimi Grade Ahi Tuna (*Note 1)
  • 1 Shallot, Thinly Sliced
  • 2 Stalks Green Onions, Chopped
  • 3 tbsp Soy Sauce (*Note 2)
  • 1 tsp Sesame Oil
  • Hawaiian Salt, To Taste (*Note 3)

OPTIONAL INGREDIENTS

  • 1 tsp Grated Ginger
  • 1 tsp Sriracha or Chili Garlic Sauce
  • 1 tsp Sesame Seeds

Instructions

  • In a medium size bowl, add the shallots, green onions, soy sauce, sesame oil, grated ginger and Sriracha and whisk to combine. Taste and adjust seasonings as needed.
  • Pat the tuna dry with a paper towel and dice into 1/2" cubes.
  • Add the cubed tuna to the bowl of marinade and gently toss to coat.
  • Transfer to servings bowls and top with sesame seeds. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate.

Notes

Note 1- The best way to find sushi grade fish is to ask a good quality fishmonger-- they can tell you which fish is safe to eat raw and which is not. Make sure to only use sushi-grade fish in this recipe. 
Note 2- If you add Hawaiian salt to the mix, use low sodium soy sauce. If you opt to exclude the Hawaiian Salt, you can use regular soy sauce. If you use regular soy sauce and the Hawaiian Salt, it will be a salt bomb in your mouth. 
Note 3- Substitute with pink Himalayan Salt if you don't want to shell out a few extra bucks for Hawaiian salt.
Nutritional information is calculated using zero salt, as individual tastes will vary.

Nutrition

Calories: 181kcal | Carbohydrates: 2g | Protein: 28g | Fat: 6g | Saturated Fat: 2g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 2g | Monounsaturated Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 43mg | Sodium: 566mg | Potassium: 334mg | Fiber: 0.4g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 2517IU | Vitamin C: 2mg | Calcium: 19mg | Iron: 2mg
Recipe Rating




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