How To Reheat Prime Rib (7 Options + Pros and Cons)

We’re Prime Rib Recipe experts here at FoodieandWine.com as many readers can attest to. Our original prime rib recipe was one of the first prime rib recipes posted online almost 10 years ago and has 5-star reader reviews, for good reason.

Since then we’ve posted guide a few helpful guides, such as this popular Temperature Chart for Prime Rib, helpful What to Serve With Prime Rib list, and Recipes with Leftover Prime Rib to maximize readers holiday success.

Prime rib is a very expensive slab of beef , even when we buy Prime Rib For Sale. Naturally, we don’t want any leftover prime rib to go to waste. As such we tested and researched the best way to reheat prime rib. It’s the gift that keeps on giving….well, at least for a few days.

Prime rib in a white dish on the stove.

If you’re looking for THE BEST RECIPES FOR PRIME RIB, here are a few:

Oven Roasted Prime Rib
Sous Vide Prime Rib
Smoked Prime Rib

For more tips, read this list of “25 Pitmaster Tips For Smoking Prime Rib“.

How To Reheat Prime Rib

Before we head into reheating recommendations, dare we suggest using it cold? You could make it part of a meal, not the main attraction. Think chopping it up and adding to a breakfast skillet, smoked chili or even using it in taco recipes.

This prime rib sandwich would still be killer with cold prime rib.

Close up of a prime rib sandwich on a black cutting board surrounded by au jus and beer.

Best Way to Reheat Prime Rib

Leftover prime rib is never as good as when it’s served straight out of the oven. You will lose a bit of juice, some of the rosy pink coloring and a bit of the tenderness. If done right, however, it will still be delectable and enjoyable; particularly if stored and cooked with a bit of prime rib au jus or even beef broth (Instant Pot Bone Broth).

Below are the best ways to reheat prime rib, from our personal favorite method to our least.

Sliced standing rib roast in a white pan.

#1 – Sous Vide

Rating: 5 out of 5

Pros:

  • Minimal water loss
  • Minimal texture change
  • Ability to get an exact temperature

Cons:

  • Time required to reheat
  • Accurate thermometer required
  • Can be difficult to maintain exact heat (if using the stove)
  • May need to learn the process

First things first – you DO NOT need a fancy sous vide machine to re-heat your prime rib roast via this method. You do however need an accurate thermometer. Here’s a quick “sous vide without a machine” guide if you’re using the stove vs a sous vide machine.

Sous vide, meaning “under vacuum” in French, involves cooking or reheating food in a water bath for extended periods of time. Using this method takes the guesswork out of timing and temperature, but does require a time commitment.

This is our favorite way to reheat prime rib as the quality of the meat beats any other option. We also have a nice collection of Sous Vide recipes to check out.

How to Reheat via Sous Vide

  • Pre-heat the sous vide machine (or a large stockpot on the oven) to 165°F (as advised by the USDA)
  • Slice the roast into even pieces and transfer them to a vacuum seal bag or Ziplock bag.
  • Add a cup of leftover prime rib au jus or beef broth, if you have on hand. Seal if using a vacuum seal bag.
  • Transfer the bag to the water. If using a Ziploc bag you’ll need to use the water displacement method to remove the air.
  • Place the bag into the pot and cook for 1 hour.
  • It’s ready to go as soon as it’s removed from the water.

Cooked Prime Rib Recipe - with two slices of pink prime rib and roasted garlic next to it.

#2 – Oven

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Pros:

  • Minimal water loss
  • Minimal texture change (If in whole roast form)
  • No special instructions or steps are required
  • No special equipment

Cons:

  • Time required to reheat isn’t exact (due to varying size)
  • Time required to reheat (If in whole roast form)

Another great option if you prefer to keep the roast whole, vs cutting it in slices is using the trusty oven to reheat. It’s as easy as any other oven roasted recipe. No skills or special equipment is needed.

How To Reheat In The Oven

  • Remove the meat from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before reheating for optimal results.
  • Pre-heat the oven to 250°F
  • Wrap the roast or slices in aluminum foil (no overlapping). Add 1/4 cup of leftover beef au jus or stock before sealing shut.
  • Transfer to the oven and let cook until the internal temperature reaches 165°F. Note – 165°F is recommended by the USDA when you’re reheating meat.
  • Check the temperature every 10-15 minutes to ensure you don’t overcook. If reheating a large roast you can start testing the temp after 20 minutes.

Cooked Prime Rib Recipe on cutting board

#3 – Air Fryer

Rating: 4 out of 5

Pros:

  • Minimal water loss
  • Minimal texture change (If in whole roast form)

Cons:

  • Special equipment required (the air fryer itself)
  • Time required to reheat isn’t exact (due to varying size)
  • Time required to reheat (If in whole roast form)
  • Stronger heat can lead to loss of moisture

If you prefer to keep the roast whole vs cutting in slices, the air fryer is a great option; although we do prefer the oven as to reduce the risk of moisture loss. As with the oven, the total time is hard to guess as it varies on the size of the leftover prime rib roast.

How to Reheat in the Air Fryer

  • Remove the meat from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before reheating for optimal results.
  • Pre-heat the air fryer to 225°F
  • Wrap the roast or slices in aluminum foil (no overlapping). Add 1/4 cup of leftover beef au jus or stock before sealing shut.
  • Transfer to the air fryer and let cook until the internal temperature reaches 165°F. Note – 165°F is recommended by the USDA when you’re reheating meat.
  • Check the temperature every 10 minutes to ensure you don’t overcook. If reheating a large roast you can start testing the temp after 15 minutes.

Large roast on a cutting board covered by foil.

#4 – Steamer

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Pros:

  • Minimal amount of water loss
  • Time required to reheat

Cons:

  • Not recommended for roast form, only slices
  • Slight change of texture
  • Difficult to test internal temperature
  • Special equipment needed (steamer or steam basket)

While steaming isn’t our favorite way to reheat prime rib, it’s not our least favorite. It’s great if you have some prime rib steaks you want to reheat without turning on the oven.

How to Reheat in the Steamer

  • Remove the meat from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before reheating for optimal results.
  • Wrap the slices in aluminum foil (no overlapping). Add 1/4 cup of leftover beef au jus or stock before sealing shut.
  • Add enough water to cover the bottom of your steamer and pre-heat until simmering.
  • Transfer the foil packet to the steamer basket and cover with the lid.
  • Steam for 3-5 minutes (will vary based on thickness).
  • Remove and test the internal temperature. If needed, keep steaming until the internal temperature reaches 165°F. Add extra water to the pot as needed. Note – 165°F is recommended by the USDA when you’re reheating meat.

Bowl of Horseradish sauce for prime rib

#5 – Slow Cooker

Rating: 3 out of 5

Pros:

  • Minimal amount of water loss
  • Easy to monitor internal temperature

Cons:

  • Not recommended for slices, only roast form
  • Temperature of slow cookers wildly varies
  • Hands on approach (as slow cooker temperatures vary)
  • Moderate change in texture
  • Special equipment required (the slow cooker itself)
  • Time required to reheat isn’t exact (due to varying size)

Reheating in a slow cooker can be done, but it’s very hit or miss depending on your slow cooker. Ours runs uber hot while our neighbors runs cool making it hard to gauge temperature and the time involved.

How to Reheat in the Slow Cooker

  • Remove the meat from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before reheating for optimal results.
  • Add the prime rib roast to the slow cooker.
  • Add enough beef au jus or beef stock to cover the prime rib.
  • Turn the slow cooker on low and cover with the lid.
  • Check the temperature every 30 minutes to ensure it doesn’t overcook.
  • Remove when the internal temperature reaches 165°F. Note – 165°F is recommended by the USDA when you’re reheating meat.

Sous Vide Ribeye Steak in a cast iron pan next to small potatoes and green beans.

#6 – Stovetop

Rating: 1.5 out of 5

Pros:

  • Quick
  • Easy to monitor internal temperature
  • No special equipment required

Cons:

  • Substantial water loss
  • Substantial change in texture (More Ribeye Than Prime Rib)
  • Not recommended for roast form (only slices)
  • Hands on approach

Here’s where things go downhill. The only reheating method rated lower than on the stovetop is in the microwave. Again, it’s not recommended however if it’s your only option, it’s better than nothing (or the microwave)!

How to Reheat on the Stove

  • Remove the meat from the refrigerator about 30 minutes before reheating for optimal results.
  • Pre-heat a skillet over medium-high heat.
  • Add about 1/4 – 1/2 cup beef broth or au jus to a non stick skillet.
  • Add the slices of prime rib.
  • Cook for 2-3 minutes, flip and cook for another 2-3 minutes, adding more broth if needed.
  • Check the temperature and continue cooking until the internal temperature reaches 165°F. Note – 165°F is recommended by the USDA when you’re reheating meat.

Cooked prime rib on a plate.

#7 – Microwave

Rating: .5 out of 5

Pros:

  • Quick

Cons:

  • Uber dry
  • Maximum reduction in water loss
  • Maximum texture change
  • Un “Prime Rib” like

We HIGHLY recommend avoiding the microwave to reheat at all costa. We would rate this a 0 out of 5, but we do realize this is the only available method for some peeps and it’s better than nothing.

Why? Microwaves cook by heating up the water molecules in food thus removing all the juicy goodness from the meat. Prime rib doesn’t have much water to begin with, so you want to keep what you have!

How to Reheat in the Microwave

  • Place the slices in a microwave-safe bowl (not overlapping) and add 1/4 cup of beef au jus or broth.
  • Cover and microwave on high until warmed throughout, approx. 1-2 minutes.
  • Heat in 30 second intervals if still cool to the touch.

How To Store Prime Rib

To keep the integrity and quality of prime rib as high as possible for re-heating, it all starts with how it’s stored.

Wrap the standing rib roast, or prime rib slices, in aluminum foil and place in an airtight container. Refrigerate for up to 4 days.

Raw prime rib on a black cutting board surrouned by garlic, black pepper salt and rosemary.

Can You Reheat Prime Rib Twice?

Negative. Do not attempt. This introduces an increase potential for bacterial growth so should be avoided. Only re-heat what you’ll eat at that particular meal.

In addition, you’ll lose double the juices and more than likely not enjoy the leftover prime rib.

Expert Tips

Keep it Together – Keep the roast as a whole vs slicing. Reheating a whole roast turns out better than slices.

Minimize the Cold – Reheat the leftovers within a day or two for the best chance of success. You can wait up to 4 days, however.

USDA Safety – Reheating to an internal temperature of 165°F is recommended by the USDA. If reheated to a lower temp, proceed at your own risk.

Substitute For Beef Broth – If you don’t have au just or beef broth on hand, here are some other ideas.

Sous_Vide_Prime_Rib

Best Way To Reheat Steak

All of the above options can also be utilized to reheat steak! Any cut of beef will work as long as you’re following the above guidelines.

More Helpful Resources and Recipes

The Best Wood For Prime Rib
Prime Rib Sauce
Prime Rib Au Jus
Prime Rib Gravy
Prime Rib Rub
Horseradish Sauce for Prime Rib
Horseradish Aioli
Prime Rib v Rib Eye

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One response to “How To Reheat Prime Rib (7 Options + Pros and Cons)”

  1. Chris Howard Avatar
    Chris Howard

    Thank you for your recipes & advice!